Home Current Archive Editorial board Program News Contact
PDF download
Cite article
Share options
Informations, rights and permissions
Issue image
Vol 77, Issue 2, 2023
Pages: 97 - 108
Review article
Medicine
See full issue

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 

Metrics and citations
Abstract views: 17
PDF Downloads: 53
Google scholar: See link
Article content
Published: 01.12.2022. Review article Medicine

Overview of non-invasive sampling methods used in intensive swine farming

By
Dimitrije Glisic Orcid logo ,
Dimitrije Glisic
Contact Dimitrije Glisic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Ljubisa Veljovic Orcid logo ,
Ljubisa Veljovic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Bojan Milovanovic Orcid logo ,
Bojan Milovanovic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Milan Ninkovic Orcid logo ,
Milan Ninkovic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Jelena Maletic Orcid logo ,
Jelena Maletic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Branislav Kureljusic Orcid logo ,
Branislav Kureljusic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Vesna Milicevic Orcid logo
Vesna Milicevic

Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Serbia,

Abstract

Monitoring the health of swine herds is essential to ensure good manufacturing practices. Traditionally, active and passive surveillance on farms involved invasive sampling methods, where specific animals were selected, restrained, and sampled. However, with the increasing intensity of swine production, alternative methods for effective herd surveillance became necessary. Non-invasive sampling provides a convenient and cost-effective approach to monitor the entire herd without compromising animal welfare, while still obtaining suitable samples for testing. Oral fluids have been widely used in both human and livestock health surveillance for various viral pathogens, including significant diseases. Nasal wipes (NW) utilize different cloth materials soaked in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or tissue culture medium with antibiotics and antimycotics to sample for swine influenza virus (SIV). Udder skin wipes (USW) offer an alternative method to assess the health status of piglets in a litter. During routine procedures such as tail docking and castration, a mixture of blood and serum can be collected, known as process fluids (PF), which has proven successful in monitoring herds for the presence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Furthermore, air sampling has emerged as a novel technique to detect pathogens in various farming systems and animal species. This method offers the advantage of obtaining diagnostic samples without direct animal contact. By employing these non-invasive sampling methods, swine producers can implement effective surveillance strategies while maintaining animal welfare standards and obtaining reliable diagnostic information.

The statements, opinions and data contained in the journal are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publisher and the editor(s). We stay neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.